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SACRO IMPERIO MEZCAL 750ml

Product image 1SACRO IMPERIO MEZCAL 750ml
Product image 2SACRO IMPERIO MEZCAL 750ml

SACRO IMPERIO MEZCAL 750ml

Regular price $52.99 Sale price $80.00

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96 Proof (ABV 48%) 

Made in Nombre de Dios, Durango, Mexico, elevation 5,700 ft. 100% wild Agave Durangensis, known locally as Cenizo, spanish for ash, for it’s grayish green color. Native to the states of Durango and Zacatecas. A hardy, frost resistent plant, it can grow in high elevations. Durango, the most northern of the 9 Mexican states and that can make a spirit named mezcal, though mezcal production has a history in many more states. Tasting notes: spice floral bouquet, peppermint, melons, vegetal, mineral, slight spicy sweet finish.

Harvesting

An abundance of Cenizo Agave grows in the high desert hills of eastern Durango, near Nobre De Dios. Burros are used to bring down the freshly harvested Cenizo piñas, before the agave makes it’s way to the vinata.

Cooking

A wood fire is started in an earthen pit that is lined with volcanic rocks from the local region. It takes about 6 hours for those volcanic rocks to get red hot. The harvested cores or “piñas” are placed in the pit and covered with leather then earth to roast for 3 to 4 days. Once the roasting is finished, the piñas are brought out of the oven to cool. Next, the roasted piñas are hand milled with an ax and crushed and shredded to extract the juices.

Fermentation

The juice, along with the fibers, called bagasso, are placed in open fermentation pits. Which are buried cypress lined tubs, about 300 liter capacity each. Once about 3/4 filled, locally sourced spring water is added, that has been heated by using it to chill the condensers of the distiller. Natural airborne yeast gets the fermentation started, which lasts 3 to 4 days. The area around the vinata is full of fruit trees and cypress.

Distillation

Then it’s double distilled in a copper pot with an oak wood hat. This wooden cone is placed on top of the copper pot that contains the fermented juice. About 4 fermentation pits fill the distillation pot. As it boils, the vapors touch the wood then travel through copper tubing that has fresh spring water cooling the vapors to create the mezcal.

About Lizarraga Company

Originally from San Diego, I moved to Mazatlan in December 2016. Around the same time, I was discovering mezcal. After tasting a dozen different mezcals, almost entirely from Oaxaca and made with espadin agave, I met the owners of mezcal from the neighboring state of Durango, spring of 2017.

I was intrigued by this new mezcal from cenizo agave that I never had before. At first sip, I knew this was something special. There were flavors and complexity that were lacking in most of the mezcals I had tried before. Sacro Imperio Mezcal was a fairly new brand when I first tasted it. They hadn't finished their registration with the Mexican government department of mezcal yet. That was finally completed in 2018.

It took me over a year from my initial applications for alcohol importing and wholesaling licenses to finally come through. I later learned that my grandfather on my mom's side, Miguel Acosta, was a mezcalero from the small village of Porras in Sinaloa, Mexico. I never knew him, as he passed away at a young age from typhoid fever, around 1948. Sacro Imperio Mezcal was imported by us into California, March 2019.

Originally from San Diego, I moved to Mazatlan in December 2016. Around the same time, I was discovering mezcal. After tasting a dozen different mezcals, almost entirely from Oaxaca and made with espadin agave, I met the owners of mezcal from the neighboring state of Durango, spring of 2017.

I was intrigued by this new mezcal from cenizo agave that I never had before. At first sip, I knew this was something special. There were flavors and complexity that were lacking in most of the mezcals I had tried before. Sacro Imperio Mezcal was a fairly new brand when I first tasted it. They hadn't finished their registration with the Mexican government department of mezcal yet. That was finally completed in 2018.

It took me over a year from my initial applications for alcohol importing and wholesaling licenses to finally come through. I later learned that my grandfather on my mom's side, Miguel Acosta, was a mezcalero from the small village of Porras in Sinaloa, Mexico. I never knew him, as he passed away at a young age from typhoid fever, around 1948. Sacro Imperio Mezcal was imported by us into California, March 2019.

This mezcal has notes of peppermint, bell peppers, melons, and minerals.

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